theatlantic:

The State of American Beer

What’s going on in Beer World? Beer lovers of America might be forgiven if their grasp of the current brew-scape feels iffy. Alice herself would be at home in this Wonderland. It’s a world in which up is down, little is big, and there’s no Blue Moon on the horizon. 
It’s a world in which old standbys are faltering (case sales of Miller High Life were down almost 10 percent in 2013 from the prior year). Mexican labels are dominant (Corona, Modelo, and Dos Equis, account for three of the top four imported beers). And a craft-beer company founded only 20 years ago is coming on strong (“Bartender, pour me a Lagunitas”).
The March 2014 issue of Beverage Industry offers us a through-the-looking-glass portrait of Beer World in the United States today. The magazine unleashed its writers on data gathered by Information Resources Inc. (IRI) of Chicago from supermarkets, drug stores, mass merchandisers, gas and convenience stores, military commissaries, and select club and dollar retail chains for the 52 weeks ending December 29, 2014. I made graphs and charts from their tabular data.
Before we delve into the particulars, let’s remember the big picture: over the past twenty years, per-capita consumption of beer in the U.S. has been declining. Derek Thompson wrote about that here last August, citing this report. But twenty years is a long lens. Let’s take a look at the state of Beer World in the last year.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

The State of American Beer

What’s going on in Beer World? Beer lovers of America might be forgiven if their grasp of the current brew-scape feels iffy. Alice herself would be at home in this Wonderland. It’s a world in which up is down, little is big, and there’s no Blue Moon on the horizon. 

It’s a world in which old standbys are faltering (case sales of Miller High Life were down almost 10 percent in 2013 from the prior year). Mexican labels are dominant (Corona, Modelo, and Dos Equis, account for three of the top four imported beers). And a craft-beer company founded only 20 years ago is coming on strong (“Bartender, pour me a Lagunitas”).

The March 2014 issue of Beverage Industry offers us a through-the-looking-glass portrait of Beer World in the United States today. The magazine unleashed its writers on data gathered by Information Resources Inc. (IRI) of Chicago from supermarkets, drug stores, mass merchandisers, gas and convenience stores, military commissaries, and select club and dollar retail chains for the 52 weeks ending December 29, 2014. I made graphs and charts from their tabular data.

Before we delve into the particulars, let’s remember the big picture: over the past twenty years, per-capita consumption of beer in the U.S. has been declining. Derek Thompson wrote about that here last August, citing this report. But twenty years is a long lens. Let’s take a look at the state of Beer World in the last year.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Vine on Tumblr: the sound of the Pacific

breakingnews:

UN court tells Japan to stop hunting whales
BBC News: Japan’s Antarctic whaling program is not for scientific purposes and must stop, the UN’s International Court of Justice has ruled.  The decision comes following a lengthy court case on the controversial practice of whale hunting
Photo: Australian Customs Service / AFP - Getty Images, file

…can’t believe it has taken this long.  Finally.  Next up, Japan’s response…

breakingnews:

UN court tells Japan to stop hunting whales

BBC News: Japan’s Antarctic whaling program is not for scientific purposes and must stop, the UN’s International Court of Justice has ruled.

The decision comes following a lengthy court case on the controversial practice of whale hunting

Photo: Australian Customs Service / AFP - Getty Images, file

…can’t believe it has taken this long. Finally. Next up, Japan’s response…

No matter what you do in LA, your behavior is appropriate for the city. Los Angeles has no assumed correct mode of use. No one’s going to save you; no one’s looking out for you. It’s the only city I know where that’s the explicit premise of living there—that’s the deal you make when you move to LA. The city, ironically, is emotionally authentic. It says: no one loves you; you’re the least important person in the room; get over it. What matters is what you do there. The whole thing is ridiculous. It’s the most ridiculous city in the world — but everyone who lives there knows that. No one thinks that L.A. “works,” or that it’s well-designed, or that it’s perfectly functional, or even that it makes sense to have put it there in the first place; they just think it’s interesting. And they have fun there. In LA, you don’t have to be embarrassed by yourself. You’re not driven into a state of endless, vaguely militarized self-justification by your xenophobic neighbors. Los Angeles is where you confront the objective fact that you mean nothing; everything there somehow precedes you, and it’s bigger than you and more abstract than you and indifferent to you. You don’t matter. You’re free.